Why Ream & Lichaj Are More Exciting Than Agudelo & Bunbury…

John Nyen is a frequent contributor at TSG.

He’s a USMNT fan as well as a Liverpool fan…and still proud.

Ah, I can see the corrugated etching on the Ballon d’Or award.

USMNT material, yes!...?

The White Whale, the Golden Idol, the Impossible Dream….. this is something that all fans of the US Mens National Team think about, a forward with the talent of Messi or Ronaldo who is American and plays for the USA. He would take passes from Holden, Bradley or “Germany” Jones and skip around defenders leaving their mouths agape and flashing the ball into the side netting.

The world would explode at his talent, and we would win the World Cup.

Eventually he would be picked up by a major team such as a Real Madrid or Barcelona. This harbinger of the explosion of skill in the US would galvanize youths with his breathtaking ability and financial windfall. When Juan Agudelo scored in his first friendly for the US at the age of 17, you could hear the pen clicks of a thousand sports writers as they salivated at the upcoming wunderkind.

Except we are all wrong.

Estimated time of delivery on Jozy?

In the eulogy for the US team in South Africa the common sports writer often bemoaned (and beat the drum) that no US forward scored. They wailed that if we wanted to be a proper team we needed to have a proper Center Forward, someone who could take the ball from the mids and put it in the back of the net. Some of the more bucolic suggested that we have an American Idol competition to attempt to find our new “talented” forward. Nevermind the fact that American Idol can’t even find good and decent music, much less someone who can take on Maicon and win.

The facts and statistics for this World Cup do not back these theories up.

When we look at the information it becomes clear…. fans of the Yanks should be praying for Full Backs and Center Backs.

We should be looking for the next Pique and Maicon, not Messi. While it would be great to have impetus at the front end the fact is that the US struggles because our defense is not as good. The team is often mislabeled as “hard working” which is really just a euphemism for “lack of talent but cohesion as a team”. However, when it comes down to it, the defense is the thing to trigger wins. It doesn’t help if we score 5 goals but let 5 in.

For example:

The top 5 scoring teams in the World Cup were:

1. Germany

2. Netherlands

3. Uruguay

4. Argentina

5. Brazil

None of whom won the world cup.

Now the argument can be made that the Netherlands came close, after all they were in the Final. However the Dutch attack resorted to playing dirty and ugly music in order to attempt to break up Spain’s possession game. Just like Argentina and Germany they couldn’t score when it mattered.

Now where do the World Champions fit in this group?

Out of all the teams that played 7 games in the World Cup, Spain had the lowest Goals Allowed with 2. TWO, the entire tournament they let in TWO goals.

Not to mention that of the two Goals that Spain let in, none of them were conceded from inside the penalty area. They were both shots from outside.

ALSO, not to mention that out of the 4 teams that played 7 games Spain had the lowest Goals For record scoring 8.

8 in 7 games.

The USA in three games less (4 played) let in 5. We conceded 3 from inside the Penalty Area and 2 from outside the area. Now the person who calls for the forward who can score would say “if we scored more then we could let in those goals and still win”. However this strategy did not work for Germany or Argentina. Basically Spain had the same Goals For ratio that the US did, except that they only let in Two. If the USA had a healthy and competent back line we wouldn’t have let in the goals that doomed us against Ghana.

The fact is that the USA did just fine at scoring goals in the World Cup, and do just fine in general at it. They aren’t spectacular akin to Germany or Argentina; however the US was 11th in the World cup in Goals For. Now this doesn’t sound great unless you consider that we only played 4 games. The teams that were above us who played four and scored more were Portugal (who drubbed North Korea and are an outlier) and the Korea Republic (who had some defensive problems of their own).

Ghana (who painfully AGAIN took the US out of the tournament) actually managed to give up less goals than the US despite playing (and giving up 1 goal) 1 more game.

It is also worth noting that England only gave up one goal in the entire group stages, the Green/Dempsey howler. The flip side of this is that with Wayne Rooney and company they only managed to score 2 goals. If we scored 5 in 4 and only gave up 1, the USA would have continued on past Ghana at the very least.

Here is another doozy. The USA was never shut out. They scored one goal in every single one of their games. Sometimes they even scored goals that seemingly didn’t go in. Even Argentina, Spain and Germany were shut out in one game.

Steely...

So this folks is why you should be giddy and excited for Tim Ream in camp. We should all be checking on Gooch’s status and where he will be playing in the future.

Clarence Goodsen, Marvel Wynne, and Heath Pierce may not be the answer but they should be developed simply because we need more bodies. Lichaj is a more exciting prospect at this point than Agudelo. This is why we need to find a left back or develop Mr. Honduras’ skill. The future is a strong back 4, who can protect the keeper and not let in the early goal, a group who are switched on, aggressive, monstrous and skillful. While it is true that I would like to see a forward that can score and put the ball in the net, it doesn’t help if we lose those games because we let two in at the other end.

It should be noted that I am not calling for a defensive game plan, actually quite the opposite. Our team would thrive and flourish if the mids didn’t have to protect the back four as much. It would allow our team to attack more and be confident in taking chances if they knew that at the other end we had the protection that we need. If you are constantly back tracking in the midfield to protect a weak spot then it becomes very difficult to get forward and trigger the offense.

So, onward Lichaj, Goodsen, Ream, Onyewu, Bornstein, Cherundolo, and all.. because the way and light will be won through defense and then exploited through Holden, Donovan, Bradley, Dempsey, and Altidore.

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43 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by kaya on 2011/01/11 at 3:02 PM

    see first 10 minutes of every US 2010 WC game… nuff said.

    Reply

  2. Posted by matt on 2011/01/11 at 3:22 PM

    nyen,

    while i agree that it’s great that we have some quality defensive prospects coming through, your argument that ream/lichaj are somehow more important to the US than are agudelo/burnbury is only valid if you value negative, boring anti-football. alternatively, if one is of the mindset that football should be attacking aesthetically pleasing, and successful, it’s hard to deny that more so than defenders, we desperately need a center midfielder in the xavi mold, and a proven 20 goals/club season attacker. until then we’ll continue to play ugly, 10 men behind the ball, bunker soccer. no thanks. while i’m pumped on ream/lichaj, burnbury, and especially agudelo has me salivating.

    Reply

    • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 3:30 PM

      Hah! I knew someone would point this out.

      which is why I included…

      “It should be noted that I am not calling for a defensive game plan, actually quite the opposite. Our team would thrive and flourish if the mids didn’t have to protect the back four as much. It would allow our team to attack more and be confident in taking chances if they knew that at the other end we had the protection that we need. If you are constantly back tracking in the midfield to protect a weak spot then it becomes very difficult to get forward and trigger the offense.”

      and while I take your criticism well, I would say that every single club and country IN THE WORLD wants a midfielder in the mold of Xavi. Wouldn’t it be great?

      I am of the mindset that football should be aesthetically pleasing, but… you know… wouldn’t every arsenal fan take a SLIGHT dip in the aesthetically pleasing if there was a trophy in the case every once in awhile? Just something to think about.

      Reply

    • Posted by alexalex on 2011/01/12 at 4:10 PM

      The whole point of saying Ream needs to be groomed rather than, say, Omar Gonzalez, is that Ream has the skill, passing, technique, and vision to play out of the back. If you watch a great team play, that first initial pass from a CB out from the goalie needs to be a smart, positive one. Ream has that quality. He’s tactically smart in defense, but I think his true best quality is playing that initial pass into a smart area or to a player who will do offensive damage.

      Reply

  3. Posted by Russ on 2011/01/11 at 3:28 PM

    The hyperbole’s a bit much. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a game the US has played where we’ve had 10 men behind the ball.

    People confuse bunkering and countering.

    Reply

  4. Posted by Brian_Goodison on 2011/01/11 at 3:28 PM

    One thing about the article, wasn’t one of the Spanish goals allowed against Switzerland from a breakaway and the shot came from inside the 18?

    Reply

    • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 3:31 PM

      Well I took the statistics from the official FIFA website, so while it is possible ( and I watched that game ) they didn’t count it. My apologies if true.

      Reply

      • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 3:51 PM

        Hmm, not sure why they didn’t count it but you are correct, I forgot about that one. It was the bum rush into the box, turn over, spill and spike goal.

        Reply

  5. Posted by Russ on 2011/01/11 at 3:33 PM

    I think the article might be a little reactionary considering how relatively fresh the memories of South Africa are.

    I don’t think defense isn’t an inherent problem for the USMNT….it just was this past summer given injuries and form (or lackthereof). How soon we forget what a huge difference a healthy Gooch/DeMerit pairing makes (see: USA v. Spain).

    Reply

    • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 3:40 PM

      Russ,

      I do agree with you (and it was the one thing I didn’t touch on) that form has much to do. The injury to Onyewu combined with Boca’s surgery had a big impact on the back line.

      The only problem is that this doesn’t explain when people were healthier why we kept letting goals in during qualifying. Especially early ones, the defense had problems pretty much the entirety of World Cup qualifying and oddly enough most of those were erased by monumental comebacks (see good enough offense).

      Reply

      • Posted by Russ on 2011/01/11 at 9:27 PM

        True. The numbers do give credence to your theory.

        I think the biggest reason why we should be so excited about the new crop of defensive prospects is simply the willingness to calmly and effectively play the ball out of the back instead of the standard panic/boot method we’ve grown so accustomed to.

        That attribute solves a lot of problems in the way of shoring up the defense and making the USMNT more attractive to watch.

        Reply

  6. Posted by matt on 2011/01/11 at 3:37 PM

    A. We frequently play with 10 men behind the ball.
    B. We frequently bunker, but playing with the primary objective of scoring goals on the counter is boring too. The objective is (or at least it should be) to control/dictate a match’s tempo via the short passing/possession game. We should be playing matches with the objective of scoring one more goal than the opposition, not trying to concede one less.

    Reply

  7. Posted by robusry on 2011/01/11 at 4:00 PM

    Gonzalez is a more exciting prospect than either of them, but this in general is just false. Sorry.

    Reply

    • Posted by dth on 2011/01/11 at 6:01 PM

      This is incorrect. Gonzalez isn’t that good. The main quality he has is that he’s dominant in the air, but he’s very weak in terms of flipping his hips and extremely weak in passing. Lichaj is far above of Gonzalez and Ream is, in my opinion, a nudge above Gonzalez.

      Reply

      • Posted by JasonPrice on 2011/01/12 at 12:21 AM

        I agree with dth on this. I just don’t think that Gonzo has the speed or the intuition that is required for the proverbial next level. I think he’ll be an MLS standout or shift to some so-so team abroad but not much more. Ream has real potential, real upside. He’s got the instinct and the speed.

        Reply

  8. gelson fernandez goal against spain was for sure inside the box, i was there.

    Reply

    • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 4:06 PM

      Yep, acknowledged that above, don’t know why fifa doesn’t count it as a goal conceded in the penalty area though. Typical fifa.. eh?

      Reply

  9. Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 4:12 PM

    2010 World Champion – Spain – Goals Against: 2
    2006 World Champion – Italy – Goals Against: 2
    2002 World Champion – Brazil – Goals Against: 4
    1998 World Champion – France – Goals Against: 2
    1994 World Champion – Brazil – Goals Against: 3

    All these teams played 3 more games than the US in their prospective World Cup winning years and gave up less goals than the US did. Defense wins championships. Offense is entertaining but without defense nothing happens. Barca wouldn’t be Barca without their back four even with Messi and Xavi. Same as Inter relied on defense to win the Champions league same as why Manchester United when Vidic and Ferdinand are healthy are always around the top two.

    Reply

    • Posted by Berniebernier on 2011/01/11 at 6:11 PM

      This was a great article. More top notch material from TSG.

      Very interesting prospective. More solid D would help the team overall. The last post by John was very telling.

      Defensive soccer can be pretty. Some people are associating defensive soccer with 10 men behind the ball bunker soccer. Barcelona has a great D in part because they control the ball and their defenders can get forward. Xavi and Inesta don’t get so far forward without solid D. Neither of them has to play D-mid. Alves can’t go forward if the other D can’t cover for him.

      Reply

  10. Posted by dth on 2011/01/11 at 5:55 PM

    I think this piece is sort of interestingly wrong and hard to talk about one way or another.

    Reason: it commits a pretty typical fallacy that people use when talking about national teams, which is applying the present to the future. That’s certainly true of all sports fans, but it’s especially true of fans of a national team–we really care about the World Cup, and as the main event is four years separated from one another, it’s pretty much guaranteed that the problems of World Cup 2010 will not be the problems of World Cup 2014.

    So if we’re talking about World Cup 2010 cycle, I wholeheartedly agree: the biggest problem with this cycle wasn’t offense, it was defense. The common perception, hardened into something like stereotype, is that this team was a bunkering, defensive one, and it’s probably because Bob Bradley looks like a guy who loves defense. I think that perception is bull. Look at the last few competitive tournaments the U.S. has played–the World Cup, the Hex, and the Confed. Cup. In each of them you’ll see that the U.S. scores a lot but lets a lot of goals in. It was top of the Hex in scoring and 3rd in goals allowed; its goal per game average was top ten in the world, and that’s with teams like Portugal included (who scored 7 goals–in one game.); a similar story with the Confederations Cup. Fact is, the team didn’t have the statistical profile of a bunkering team, and that’s because it wasn’t. The defensive weakness of the team is probably more galling when you consider that the U.S. has been continuously able to call on an often-heroic goalkeeper.

    That said, the diagnosis of Spain’s victory is probably incorrect. It was the offense that won them the World Cup–it reduced every opponent to bunkering; ball control and time of possession destroyed all adversaries. That’s offense; but I suppose it’s also defense.

    The problems of World Cup 2014 will likely look far different, though. The offensive engines of the USMNT were Donovan and Dempsey, and they will be old in soccer terms by World Cup 2014. We’ve seen how much the team struggles to score without either one of them; developing replacements will be necessary to tread water. And, frankly, since we don’t have an elite offense, we actually need to develop improved replacements if we want to win the World Cup. Developing defenders is also a top priority, so you’re not wrong there, but in so doing one of the top qualities to look for is passing out of the back. It was abysmal last cycle, and I can only dream of how many fewer goals conceded and how many more goals scored there would’ve been had there been a few defenders capable of building an attack out of the back.

    Reply

    • Posted by John on 2011/01/11 at 6:40 PM

      dth, I agree with you on many fronts.

      I tend to think that the offense of Spain was freed up by the strength of their back four. I mean Xavi isn’t going to go back to break up the attack and neither (too much) is David Villa. While the ball control restricts the other team to bunkering, teams that came out and played offensive football were unable to make an impact either. After all Spain only gave up one goal before the final game, and it was on a complete scramble at the goal mouth/incredible situation.

      You can look at that as Defense by Offense, but I tend to think that if Xavi had to cover for Pique or Puyol that he wouldn’t be nearly as effective.

      As far as looking forward, I tend to have a more positive outlook on the offensive side than the defensive side of the ball.

      Primarily in the fact that:

      We have attacking and defending midfield options.

      We have people like Bedoya, Holden, Diskerud (perhaps), Bradley, Edu, and to a certain extent we will have Donovan or Dempsey (I tend to think not both).

      Up top we are developing things in the terms of Agudelo, Bunbury, Davies, Altidore (maybe), and even long shots like Doyle.

      However, I want to know who is playing LB. Really.

      who do we have there that is up coming or good or even a reason to get excited about? Are we looking at playing Lichaj out of position? Bornstein?
      Boca is getting up there as is Cherundolo, and Demerit isn’t necessarily young. It looks that Spector is moving to Midfield (although club form doesn’t dictate National team form, even though I don’t want him in the back four) My concern here is with the defense because the talent and outlook for it is currently far weaker, and the idea that there are people out there like Lichaj, Ream, Gonzalez and their ilk is far more exciting to me, because the alternate reality of no lichaj, ream, and gonzalez… is… well.. Jonathon Spector and Johnathon Bornstein manning the LB and RB position.

      Reply

    • Posted by dikranovich on 2011/01/11 at 6:57 PM

      it is interestingly unfunny though that usa did lose to ghana and got knocked out of the world cup in 06 and then again the same damn thing happened in 2010, with the same team, hopefully 2014 will be different.

      Reply

      • Posted by dth on 2011/01/11 at 7:12 PM

        Both teams were very different from their 2006; Ghana improved more quickly than did the U.S. I’m not quite sure where that comes from.

        If you want to use the quick-and-dirty heuristic–players in top five European leagues (and then players in champions league clubs there), Ghana comes out ahead on both counts:

        2010: US: 12 (1); Ghana: 15 (3)
        2006: US: 7 (1); Ghana 8 (3)

        Reply

    • Posted by mbw on 2011/01/11 at 10:36 PM

      “I can only dream of how many fewer goals conceded and how many more goals scored there would’ve been had there been a few defenders capable of building an attack out of the back.”

      This is exactly what makes Ream exciting. The US midfield will almost certainly be stronger in possession in the next cycle — why not make use of it? With his ability to play the ball into midfield, Ream is the anti-Gooch.

      Incidentally, Boss is supposed to be strong with the ball also.

      Reply

      • Posted by dth on 2011/01/11 at 11:01 PM

        Boss is very good with the ball. The usual disclaimers apply to the following YouTube video, but it should give you a general idea what’s involved with Boss:

        Of the u-20s, Boss just might have the highest ceiling–unfortunately, he wasted months in his development because of Traffic.

        Reply

    • Posted by GeorgeCross on 2011/01/12 at 11:33 AM

      To annex DTH’s 4th paragraph:

      If you look at Greece’s Euro2004 victory, and Spain’s Euro2008 and WC2010 – both teams won their knockout games 1-0. But both teams played a completely different brand of football.

      I don’t think you can paint the complete picture when looking at the statistics in isolation. And I feel that this is one of the beauties of football. There are so many intangibles that cannot be statistically measured in a meaninful way, such as intelligent pressing and movement.

      Reply

      • Posted by John on 2011/01/12 at 11:53 AM

        Completely agree George, although the one similarity is that they didn’t give up goals.

        The US did, repeatedly, at bad times and early in the halves.

        Absolutely they (Spain and Greece) played completely different forms of football, but the end result (whether defense by offense, or offense by defense) is that they didn’t give up goals.

        As Argentina and Germany proved at this World Cup it isn’t enough to score a boatload of goals, you need to be able to stop the other person from scoring just one.

        If the US had stopped just one Ghana goal they would have been into the next round but their form over the last year or two had been to give up early and crippling goals, and they did again. Not the sign of a good defense.

        And while US fans are fond of talking about the Spain confederations cup game (which was fantastic, don’t get me wrong) we tend to slightly forget about the Brazil debacle to follow, in which the US couldn’t protect a 2 goal lead.

        Considering that most defensive national team players tend to not be 18 year old wunderkinds, what the US is looking at now with potential as 20 year olds are probably what they will have in the next world cup. Thus the reason to be afraid and excited.

        Reply

  11. Posted by Alex Song on 2011/01/11 at 6:42 PM

    One thought:

    Perhaps the best defense is a good offense?

    I think part of the reason why Spain allowed so few goals was because they possessed the ball well (Xavi, Iniesta, Fabregas, etc) and because teams were terrified of their attack (Villa, Torres, Llorente, etc). It must be a lot easier to defend when the other team is on its heels the whole game.

    Anyhow, the USA’s talent on defense will rise as the overall number of quality prospects playing soccer increases. The problem right now is that anyone with the pace/quickness/strength/skill of a Bacary Sagna/Ashley Cole/Patrice Evra would immediately be moved to midfield or forward.

    Reply

    • Posted by jmanking05 on 2011/01/11 at 8:45 PM

      These are my thoughts too. If you possess the ball for 2/3s of the game, like spain likes to do, it is hard for the opposing team to take shots on your defense. On the other hand it is ironic that the only game that spain lost against the swiss they held the ball almost the whole game and the swiss only won it on the counter…… which is similar to how usa beat spain in the confederations cup.

      Reply

  12. Posted by phlub on 2011/01/11 at 8:31 PM

    Let’s not forget the importance of scoring first and if possible… not having to wait until the 93rd minute to do so. This is something the US failed to do in every match in South Africa.

    It made the Cup nerve racking and exciting for US fans to watch. But realistically… ball control, tempo, and mindset can all HELP be controlled by taking the first lead.

    A world class striker could obviously help with that. Putting talented pressure on an opponent’s defense makes things easier for our defense and midfield play.

    That being said… I like Jozy, and I think we’ll have something in 2014 more improved than 2010 (be it Teal or Juan or someone on the cusp). However I think it’s important that US strikers begin gain value in the European soccer market. As mentioned a few articles ago… Buddle (the top scoring MLS and US World Cup team subbed-in striker) is only finding a loan place with a 2nd division German club. Findley with a Championship side. Our keepers get the respect, defenders are finding their way, mid’s are close. But we have ZERO strikers establishing themselves as top European talent. I think this is the next step forward to rounding out an internationally experienced, top class World Cup squad.

    Not ruling out a CD9 comeback… but also not sure that’d be the answer either.

    Reply

    • Posted by phlub on 2011/01/11 at 8:49 PM

      Great article btw… I really think this starts a valuable discussion we’ll certainly be having for the next 4 years and the 4 years after that…

      Reply

  13. Posted by Matthew on 2011/01/11 at 8:42 PM

    All I know is that the defense is going to have to step it up at the Gold Cup this summer when Hernandez comes to town…he’s been playing frighteningly good with Manchester United lately…

    Reply

    • Posted by dth on 2011/01/11 at 9:15 PM

      Actually, not particularly worried about Chicharito–he doesn’t really create goals inasmuch as finish them (with great aplomb!) Therefore I’m more worried about the guys who are getting Chich the ball–the Guardados, dos Santoses, Velas, etc.

      Reply

  14. Posted by jeffme on 2011/01/11 at 11:07 PM

    Am I the only one thrown off by all of the weird capitalization in these articles? What’s going on?

    Reply

  15. Posted by nelson on 2011/01/12 at 9:06 AM

    btw, @TSG beckham only had a blister as far as injury goes.

    Reply

  16. Posted by dth on 2011/01/12 at 6:18 PM

    To take a little tangent–saw Conor Wickham play in the Carling Cup match today vs. Arsenal. The rare English prospect for whom the megabucks might actually end up being worth it, I think; I suspect also a higher ceiling than Carroll. England–now there’s a country that desperately needs strikers. Amirite?

    Reply

    • Posted by GeorgeCross on 2011/01/13 at 7:34 AM

      He was played out of position, out wide on the left, and thought he did very well – albeit against Eboue, not sure I’d be saying the same if he face Sagna. But he showed glimpses of his talent when he cut in and has a good touch, and has pretty good upper body strength for a 17 year old. He will move to an EPL club, just a matter of which one.

      Yeah, we’re not exactly blessed with many Rooney’s coming through the youth teams, but we’ve got Delfoneso (sp?), Welbeck, Sturridge as well as Carroll, not to mention Walcott and Johnson. I can also see Walcott playing down the middle for Arsenal at some stage (not moving permanently)…

      Then there are the ex-Palace loanees / players: Moses, Zaha and Sears…

      Reply

      • Posted by dth on 2011/01/13 at 8:40 AM

        I also like Welbeck quite a bit too, though I’m wondering whether his best long-term position is winger. Welbeck and Juan Agudelo seem verrry similar to me also, though obviously Welbeck belongs the club with a more prestigious shade of red…

        Reply

        • Posted by GeorgeCross on 2011/01/13 at 9:02 AM

          I will keep an eye on Juan Agudelo this season. I was at that Cup game vs. Union but the only memory I have was Le Toux being the best player on the pitch and getting injured.

          Trying to convince Mrs Cross that a season ticket is the way forward…

          Reply

  17. Italy had the 2nd leading GF in WC 2006 and they won the World Cup. I think you manipulated some stats in your favor but nice try. Although I agree defense maybe more important in international tournaments because of the conservative nature of those type of competitions. But as a NY Red Bull fan, I’ll tell you why Ream is more exciting than Agudelo … he is more of an adventure in the back than the current mainstream press perceives him.

    Reply

  18. [...] contributor John Nyen, published an interesting piece on why one should be more excited about Tim Ream and Eric Lichaj versus Juan Agudelo and Teal [...]

    Reply

  19. I agree I think Lijach and Tim Ream are the best defense the us ever had. Because of the skills that they possess. Onyehu I never like him too much is big,strong but doesn’t have the skill to play the game that’s why Barcelona don’t want him. Omar Gonzalez ( SORRY NOT GOOD ENOUGh) NO SKILLS.
    I Like Goodson he is pretty good, and also good in the air but I likes to see him bigger stronger to be in the back line.
    Okay I’m not agree with the comments about the offense. The US always lack of offense always come back from behind to try to tight or win a game at home or away to a mediocre oponent team in the central america, that not even consired as a good team. Now with Agudelo, Bunburry, Diskerud in the line- up hopefully this will change. Let’s cross our fingers for those boys.

    Reply

  20. I agree I think Lijach and Tim Ream are the best defense the us ever had. Because of the skills that they possess. Onyehu I never like him too much is big,strong but doesn’t have the skill to play the game that’s why Barcelona don’t want him. Omar Gonzalez ( SORRY NOT GOOD ENOUGh) NO SKILLS.
    I Like Goodson he is pretty good, and also good in the air but I like to see him bigger stronger to be in the back line.
    Okay I’m not agree with the comments about the offense. The US always lack of offense always come back from behind to try to tight or win a game at home or away to a mediocre oponent team in the central america, that not even consired as a good team. Now with Agudelo, Bunburry, Diskerud in the line- up hopefully this will change. Let’s cross our fingers for those boys.

    Reply

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